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Human Autonomic Neurophysiology

We are focused on understanding how cortical and subcortical areas of the brain interact to control blood pressure in health and cardiovascular disease?

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Latest Achievements

President of the International Society for Autonomic Neuroscience (2013–2015)

Member of International Programming Committee, International Society for Autonomic Neuroscience (2006–2017)

Member of the Board of Directors of the American Autonomic Society (2011–2013)

Co-Chief Editor of Frontiers in Autonomic Neuroscience

Sunderland Award for Excellence in Sensorimotor Biology, Ian Potter Foundation (2006)

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Professor Vaughan G Macefield Senior Principal Research Fellow
How do cortical and subcortical areas of the brain interact to control blood pressure in health and cardiovascular disease?

Research staff

Ms Tye Dawood

 

About the Human Autonomic Neurophysiology laboratory

The Human Autonomic Neurophysiology laboratory uses invasive and non-invasive approaches to understand the neurophysiological substrates responsible for normal and disturbed cardiovascular control. Combining direct intraneural recordings of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brain, the laboratory aims to identify the functional and structural changes in the brain that lead to the increases in MSNA in different cardiovascular diseases, as well as conducting research to increase our understanding of normal physiological processes.

The work of this laboratory focuses on:

  • Functional and structural changes in the brain in cardiovascular disease.
  • Identifying the central neural substrates of hypertension.
  • Effects of pain on the sympathetic nervous system and blood pressure.
  • Contributions of the vestibular system to blood pressure regulation.

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With the rising number of Australians affected by diabetes, heart disease and stroke, the need for research is more critical than ever.

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